Tag Archives: mindfulness

Summer Self-Care

Practicing self-care is filling your own cup.

It is important to remember that you cannot fill someone else’s cup without first filling your own.

Every time we fly the flight attendants provide a friendly reminder “Please put your oxygen mask on first.” In every day living how do we do this?

Is there enough time? Short answer…..yes.

Self-care can be as small as reading 10 pages of a book you’ve been wanting to read, walking past your favorite courtyard at work, treating yourself to a coffee, calling up a good friend.

In essence….reaching out.

Practicing self-care professionally and personally helps us to continue with our drive and focus. Thinking about what we need throughout our day (which is often different every day) helps us to become more self-aware reflective, and capable of regulating our emotions. What do you need before a big meeting? What do you need before going home to your family? It can be as simple as a 5 minute break listening to a favorite song, or even sitting in silence, reflecting on a powerfully positive memory.

Fill your cup throughout the day….all day.

Some days we need more brain breaks than others….

This is true for people of all ages.

We can teach our children self-care and self-reflection by teaching them things they can do or ask for to help fill their own cups. We can also provide verbal feedback that helps them fill their own cups.

  1. Have healthy snacks where they can reach. Helping them to understand that when they are feeling hungry or tired they can solve that feeling (in a healthy way) on their own.
  2. Children thrive on structure, but also need down time to help them to regulate their ever changing systems. Schedule unstructured down time. Have an impromptu dance party, act out a favorite book, paint, build a fort, share a book. Give them time to exercise their imagination.
  3. When your child has excess energy avoid telling them to stop, and give them strategies for calming down instead. Go for a walk or scooter ride, incorporate movement breaks into homework, have them help you carry things while at the store.
  4. Point out the positive! When your child tries something new, shares, or works through a problem help them fill their cup! Give them specific compliments, “You worked really hard and stuck with it to finish that puzzle!”, “You are so caring and thoughtful of others when you share.” Give them words that they can identify themselves as in their self talk and identity. “I am hard working, I am kind.”

Big picture: take time for self-care! The time you spend on yourself is your most important investment. Schedule 5-10 minutes 5 to 10 times a day to practice self-care, or take 30 minutes to yourself 2 times a day. The little moments that we allow ourselves to meet our needs, and fill our cups, result in a larger appreciation of ourselves, and a greater ability to help others.

 

What’s on Your Mental Plate?

Diet is a popular topic no matter what age we are.  We are consistently being reminded to be mindful of what we and our families eat.  It’s important and we know it!

“You are what you eat.”

But you are also what you THINK. 

Do you ever feel run down?  Like you have no time for yourself, let alone for others? So what is on your mental plate?  Are you mindful of the activities that fill, challenge, reward, or deplete your brain on a daily and weekly basis?  How much work is too much work?  How little play is too little play?  What are you doing to positively feed your brain as well as your body? We are all individuals, with individual minds and bodies, that require individual diets.  As adults it is easy to say “I’m just too busy…..”, but what that actually means is “I am choosing to focus my time and energy elsewhere”.  Ask yourself: do you know exactly where, and how much?  An activity that can help with increasing this level of self-awareness is actually tracking where and how you spend your time.   Portioning out your mental plate.  ALL of it! Move over leafy greens……time to chew on some mental game changers.

Taking a simple planner and jotting down the activities during your day and the time they took can help you have that Aha! Moment where you realize it is possible to exercise for 30 minutes! You do have time to do something that brings you JOY.  You are spending way too much time in an area that doesn’t need it, or too little in an area that does! Take that opening that you can now SEE in your calendar (there you are 15 extra minutes!) and schedule that goal you have had on your mind!

Throughout the day we need time to let our brains experience emotional learning through those things that make us feel good!  Your time is your most valuable asset, and you can make choices to make the most of it!

I teach this concept of time awareness and “giving back to your brain” to my students.  I want them to know they can choose to reward themselves with time, rather than simply spending it.  I have used an actual paper plate and I have also used a wall clock and different colored dry erase markers to teach this skill.  The students portion out the time they think it will take to complete activities, the time they need for “brain breaks”, and the time they would want to themselves. These visuals help my students see how much of their time is spent in different areas.  When they visually see what they need to get done, and set a time goal, they are typically excited to find out they have more time for themselves at the end of a session!  A double win: intrinsic motivation and learning executive functioning and organizational skills!

Today

Take a look at your mental plate and take time BACK for yourself.  Give your mind a healthy and BALANCED mental meal…..you deserve it!