Saying Yes to Saying No

“No” is not a negative word.

The word “no” from a very young age can be difficult to hear. Especially as children develop language as a form of communication, and realize the power it has. As adults we can get so excited that our children are talking, requesting, and commenting that we get caught up in the “yes” moment. We also, as human beings, would rather cultivate happiness in others than disappointment (and maybe a tantrum or two). Enter the “no” stigma. At work we may struggle to say no to a boss, out of concern that one “no” could change their perception of us for the rest of our career. At home we may struggle to say “No” to a child or partner out of fear of an argument. However, what if our negative perception of “no” is actually costing us? Over committing, unable to deliver, personal stress, professional stress…

“No” is not about taking away or losing….

“No” is about CREATING and RESPECTING boundaries.

Learning to accept the word “no” and setting boundaries from an early age helps build delayed gratification, problem solving, and the ability to ask for help. Social Emotional Competencies that are strong indicators for future career and relationship successes.

When you HEAR the word “No” how do you feel physically? How do you feel mentally? How do you feel emotionally?

When you SAY the word “No” how do you feel physically? How do you feel mentally? How do you feel emotionally?

Eliminating the negative emotions around “No” (if you have them) means changing your definition or perception of the word.

Using the word “no” means you are setting clear boundaries, you are saying “yes” to what you know you can do at your highest level, you are learning to delegate, you are learning to admit what you do not know, what you want to learn, you are helping a child learn realistic expectations.

You are being respectful of yourself and others.

Teaching children to accept and use “No” is important for their emotional and intellectual growth. It helps them manage relationships, accept direction, and increase their ability to stick with the things that may be difficult for them in order to receive the ultimate reward at the end. It is an element that leads them to develop perseverance and the ability to understand another person’s perspective. People have different thoughts and expectations. You will not always hear “Yes”. In fact, “Yes” will not always be best.

If you have a child who constantly uses “No”, start asking them “Why?” Then take it a step further. Ask them how they feel, how they are making others feel. Ask if there are any other options you could use to meet both of your expectations. Reflect on how often you tell them “No”. Is it all the time? Are we asking the child to be flexible when we are not? In certain instances “No” is not an option. In these cases it can be helpful to give children a choice of two things you want them to do, where either is acceptable. Not starting with “Do you want…”, but a statement “Should we put on your shoes first or your coat?” Practicing hearing “No” in play, as a problem solving game, can also be helpful. For example, painting with different colors and having your child request them. When they ask for orange you can say “No. We can’t use the orange today, but we could see if two colors make orange!” Then let your child mix the paint colors and take guesses! They are practicing hearing and accepting “No”, as well as learning logic!

Saying and hearing “No” is not about highlighting denial or negativity. Its acceptance represents positive growth. It encompasses the ability to set boundaries. It provides the opportunity to practice flexibility and perseverance in navigating road blocks to success. It is a valuable tool in cultivating respect in ourselves and others.

 

 

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